Arc de Triomphe (Triumphal Arch) Paris France Part 1



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The Arc de Triomphe is one of the most familiar monuments in Paris, France.This image was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.

The Arc de Triomphe is located on one of Paris’ most famous avenues, the Champs-Elysees. The Arc de Triomphe’s location on this map is marked by the red dot.This image was created using googlemaps at approximately 3:00 PM on Friday, August 17, 2018.

The Arc de Triomphe is located on what is today called Place Charles de Gaulle, who was a French military hero during World War II, and later a President of France. The area had previously been called the Place de l’Etoile or “Place of the Star” for the twelve avenues radiating from or meeting at this location.This image was created using googlemaps at approximately 3:00 PM on Friday, August 17, 2018.

It originally honored those who fought and died for France during the French Revolution (1789-1799), and during the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815).This image was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.

Now the Arc honors those who fought and died for France in later military conflicts, including World War I, World War II, Algeria, Korea, and Vietnam.This image was taken facing west at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.

The Arc de Triomphe was ordered to be constructed in 1806 by French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte.This painting by Jacques-Louis David (1748-1825) in 1812 is titled “The Emperor Napoleon in His Study at the Tuileries.” It is courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
The Battle of Austerlitz, in which France defeated both Russia and Austria, is considered to be one of Napoleon’s greatest triumphs.This image, titled “The Battle of Austerlitz” was painted by Francois Gerard (1770-1837) in 1805. It is courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

It was modeled on the Arch of Titus, located at the entrance to the Forum in Rome, Italy.This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, August 5, 2018.

Rome’s Arch of Titus was constructed in 82 AD to remember commander and later Roman Emperor Titus’ (39-81) military victories, including his victory over the Jews during the Siege of Jerusalem in 70 AD.This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 9:00 AM on Sunday, August 5, 2018.

The Arch of Titus in Rome is 50 feet tall, 44 feet wide, and 15.5 feet in depth.This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 9:00 AM on Sunday, August 5, 2018.
The Arc de Triomphe in Paris is much larger than the Arch of Titus in Rome. Instead of being 50 feet tall, it is 164 feet tall.This image was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.

Paris’ Arc de Triomphe has a depth of 72 feet (left to right in this photograph) instead of 15.5 feet at Rome’s Arch of Titus.This image was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.

While the Arch of Titus is 44 feet wide, the Arc de Triomphe is 148 feet wide.This image was taken facing south at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.

Although the monument was ordered to be constructed in 1806 it took two years to put the foundations in place.This image was taken facing southeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.
After the Arc de Triomphe’s architect died in 1811 the work slowed.This image was taken facing south at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.

From 1814 to 1830 (except for a brief period in 1815 when Napoleon returned to power) the brothers of the French King Louis XVI came to power and work was not continued on this monument that honored the overthrow of the monarchy.This image was taken facing east at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.
From 1833-1836 a new French King, Louis Philippe (1733-1850) allowed the Arc de Triomphe to be completed.This image was taken facing northeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.

Following its completion, the Arc de Triomphe became THE patriotic place for French troops to parade after successful military campaigns.This image was taken facing northeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.

The anniversary of the beginning of the French Revolution, July 14, 1789, and which is known as Bastille Day (the equivalent of our Fourth of July), is prominently celebrated at the Arc de Triomphe.This image was taken facing northeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.

An embarrassment for the French is when the Prussians (Germans) won the Franco-Prussian War, they celebrated around the Arc de Triomphe when they entered Paris on March 1, 1871.This image is courtesy of Brown University.

When the Germans occupied Paris at the beginning of World War II, they also celebrated around the Arc de Triomphe.This image was taken facing northwest on June 14, 1940. This image is courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
When the “Free French” army under General Charles de Gaulle reoccupied Paris in 1944, they celebrated at the Arc de Triomphe.This image was taken facing northwest on August 26, 1944. It is courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The United States Army also marched around the Arc de Triomphe and down the Champs Elysee after they helped the French to liberate Paris from the Germans.This image was taken facing northwest on August 29, 1944.

Although Mr. Housch attempted to take pictures of the Arc de Triomphe while few cars were around it, twelve roads leading into the area means that there is usually a lot of traffic, especially during the morning rush hour when Mr. Housch was present.This image was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.
To get from the side of the street where he was taking pictures, to the other side of the street to where the Arc de Triomphe is located, one needs to take this underground tunnel.This image was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Thursday, August 2, 2018.